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Prayer

The Angelus

The Angelus prayer interrupts our business to recognize the important moment when God was accepted into the world as a human by Mary.

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary:
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit.

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of
our death. Amen.

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word.

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of
our death. Amen.

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us.

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of
our death. Amen.

Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray:
Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

About the Angelus prayer (from Catholic.com):
The Angelus is traditionally offered at 6 a.m., noon, and 6 p.m. every day. It is one of the simplest yet most profound prayers in the Church: daily recalling to our minds that universe-shaking moment when the omnipotent, eternal God, through the consent of a teenage girl, willed himself to become a human embryo. It is so immense and absolute an idea that the very words almost resist being typed.
By praying the Angelus, boldly repeating the same words that set our salvation in motion even as we had just been eating or playing golf or watching TV, we reflect and re-present the Incarnation’s radical parameters. A little over 2,000 years ago in ancient Judea, the world was just going about its business when suddenly the King of the world burst into it and nothing was ever the same. Yet the world continued on its course, watching and waiting for the revelation of the gospel (in Christ’s ministry, now past) and the glory of the kingdom (in his Second Coming, still future). In the Angelus we interrupt our business to recognize the importance of that moment, then we, too, go back to the mundane labors and pleasures that make up regular life, watching and waiting for Christ to complete his work in us.

This prayer originated in the 12th century, but its present form was evolved in the 16th century. More information about it here at ourcatholicprayers.com